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DIFFERENCES BETWEEN QUARTZITE & QUARTZ

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN QUARTZITE & QUARTZ

If you judge quartz and quartzite by their name, you'd probably assume they are the same thing or at least a variation of each other. However, you might be surprised to find out these two materials are actually quite different from each other.

Keep reading below to find out the main and key differences between these two stones and find out which one might be best for your countertop needs.


Composition

The biggest difference between quartz and quartzite is that quartz is a man-made stone, while quartzite is a natural stone.

A quartzite countertop begins as sandstone, and under a natural process of heat and pressure is fused with sparkly quartz crystals. A quartz countertop is engineered with the quartz crystals found in quartzite, bonded with resins, pigments, and other materials such as glass.

 

Style

Quartzite comes in shades of white or light grey, but the minerals in the stone can show pink, gold, or brown hues. Quartzite has a delicate veining pattern, so it is often confused with certain types of marble.

On the other hand, because quartz is a man-made stone it can be made to look like any stone and can be found in many shades and patterns.

 

Care Routine and Durability

Quartz is a significantly more durable material, it is a hard surface that is non-porous and resistant to chipping scratching, and bacteria. 

Quartzite is a fairly hard stone, a good choice for outdoors, but it is more susceptible to staining and chipping. Quartzite requires sealing every year to prevent staining the surface, while quartz needs no extra maintenance.

For both countertops, you must engage in good cleaning practices. Wipe spills immediately and use dish soap with warm water for day-to-day cleaning.

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